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scherzinger (4K)
A long pass from Victor Scherzinger, left, to Frank Prucka put NU in scoring position, but the game ended before the Huskers could run another play.
scherzinger (4K)
A long pass from Victor Scherzinger, left, to Frank Prucka put NU in scoring position, but the game ended before the Huskers could run another play.

Nebraska 0
SMU 0

Oct. 5, 1929

In Dana X. Bible’s debut as Nebraska's coach, the Huskers and Southern Methodist battled to a 0-0 tie in Lincoln.

It was hardly a thing of beauty. The Associated Press summed it up this way:

“There were thrilling plays, some tense moments, vicious tackles, daring tries for long passes, which, had they been caught, would have meant victory, but for the most part the game was colorless. Nebraska’s rushes — the favored and most successful play of the Cornhuskers in past seasons — accounted for many yards between the 20-yard lines but failed utterly when near the last marker.”
rowley (5K)
It was a costly game for Rowley

The Huskers had their chances, particularly in the second half. A 28-yard punt gave them the ball at the SMU 32 yard line in the third quarter, but they turned the ball over on downs at the visitors’ 18. In the fourth quarter, Nebraska took over on the SMU 20 after an interception by Felber Maasdam, but a penalty and then an interception killed that threat. In the game's waning seconds, a long pass from Victor Scherzinger to Frank Prucka put the ball on the SMU 20, but Nebraska was unable to run another play before the final whistle.

NOTES: Nebraska halfback Claude Rowley was injured when he was tackled at the end of a 12-yard run in the third quarter. He would not play again until the season finale. ... All-conference fullback Clair Sloan sat out the game because of an injury.

Coverage: Omaha World-Herald    AP (1, 2)    Yearbook

LINCOLN, Neb. Oct. 5. -- The major intersectional football game in the Missouri Valley sector today ended in a scoreless tie when Nebraska, Big Six champions last year, and Southern Methodist university of Dallas, battled 60 minutes with neither team able to gain the decision. There were thrilling plays, some tense moments, vicious tackles, daring tries for long passes, which, had they been caught, would have meant victory, but for the most part the game was colorless. Nebraska's rushes – the favored and most successful play of the Cornhuskers in past seasons – accounted for many yards between the 20-yard lines but failed utterly when near the last marker. The Texans failed to show a consistent offense throughout the entire game, but were equal to the occasion when Nebraska's red-clad warriors were hammering at their goal. The final whistle may have prevented a Nebraska touchdown, for just prior to its shriek a long pass, Victor Scherzinger to Frank Prucka, put the ball within the Texans' 20-yard line and Coach Dana X. Bible was ready to rush in reserves to batter the wilting Southern Methodist line. Weldon “Speedy” Mason, the Southern Methodist quarterback, was the player around whom the Lone Star boys' plays revolved and he strove mightly to run, pass or kick. Louie Long and George Koontz, the ends, were outstanding defensively but the more than 20,000 fans in Memorial Stadium were disappointed that the famed open game of the Mustangs did not function. At the start, a Nebraska slaughter seemed imminent. With Claude Rowley and Captain George Farley carrying the bail behind a fast charging line, two first downs were marked up in as many minutes. Then the drives were halted to be started many other times but never maintained long enough to bring touchdowns. The pony backs of Nebraska -- Clark McBride, Robert “Red” Young, Art Perry and Bernard Marquis -- entered the game in the second period along with several fresh linesmen, and for a few minutes outgained the starting backs but their drive soon faltered. The game was slowed by numerous time outs for injuries and consultation. First Period Nebraska could not gain and punted. Southern Methodist failed on an end run, a line tmuh and a pa*. Davidson punted to Peaker, who was downed by Lon^ on Nebraska's 15-yard line. .The Huskers immediately punted and Mason returned 20 yards to the Husker 37-yard line. Again the Texans failed to gain, but Mason's punt stopped lust short of the Nebraska Huskers. Again It was the am* old storyMustang play* failed. They punted Nebraska began another advance but it was stopped and Southern Methodist had the bail on Nebraska's 37-yard tin* a* the half ended. Score: Nebraska 0; Southern Methodist* 0. Mason's Punt Fumbled Nebraska started the second half with the same lineup that started the game. Captain George Farley returned the kickoff 54 yards to the Texans' 34-yard line. Packer punted 30 yards, the ball going outside on the Texans' four-yard marker, r^av- idson's punt traveled only 28 yards to the SMU 32-yard tine. Claude Rowley made a brilliant run around left end for 12 yards but was hurt when tackled and left the field in favor of Robert “Red” Young. The left side of the Texans' line then repulsed four line attacks and the Mustangs took the ball on their own 18-yard line. SMU guard Henry “Choc” Sanders was hurt but remained in the game. The Methodists got five yards around left end. Mason's punt was fumbled by Packer and recovered by SMU. A line play failed and another Mason punt was caught by Packer on his own 25-yard line. The remainder of the quarter was spent mostly in exchanging punts or taking time out. At the end, the score remained Nebraska 0, SMU 0. No Gain In Air Fourth period: Nebraska hopes, which rose at the start of the period when Felber Maasdam intercepted Mason's pass and raced within 20 yards of a touchdown, fell as tapidly as they had risen. A five-yard penalty and an intercepted rass spoiled an excellent Husker chance to score. SMU foozled several pass attempts and Mason's punt was short, giving the Huskers another scoring chance which they threw to the winds. S.M.U. tried desperate passes to score. They failed. A long pass put Nebraska in scoring distance as the game ended. Final: Nebraska 0; SMU 0.